WWII Nazi bunker with bullet holes found in Poland

WWII Nazi bunker with bullet holes found in Poland



WWII Nazi bunker with bullet holes found in Poland

A wooden underground bunker built by the Nazis during the Second World War Era has been unearthed in Lublin, Poland. In the bunker, with bullet marks on the walls, the skeletons of two soldiers and various pieces of uniforms were found, as well as Nazi and Red Army ammunition. Experts announced that they think there is an intense conflict in the shelter.

In Lublin, Poland, a WWII-era bunker made of wood by Nazi Germany has been found buried underground. The discovery was made by construction workers working on the construction of a new parking garage under the former Clothing and Fabric Schools Group. The nearly 80-year-old building contains three underground corridors, concrete walls and a staircase with ceilings surrounded by wooden beams.
In addition to the bunker, archaeologists found several bottles of mineral water brought from both Germany and the Czech Republic, as well as the remains of ammunition belonging to both the Wehrmacht and the Red Army.
According to experts, the wooden bunker may have been the site of an intense battle in 1944 between the Germans and the Soviet Red Army during the invasion of the country. Lublin Monument Conservator Dariusz Kopciowski stated that the construction must be stopped so that the experts can carefully examine the remains of the bunker.
Kopciowski added that the tunnels were excavated using the drilling method and built on-site without removing the upper ground.
“After agreeing with the conservator’s office on a further method to study and document such an extraordinary discovery, archaeologists began exploring the interior of one of the corridors,” said Kopciowski.
However, construction was temporarily delayed as a result of the discovery. Polish media reported that in April the skeletons of two Nazi soldiers were found in the area, along with buttons, helmets, pieces of uniforms and a tag.
On the other hand, after Poland was occupied by both the Germans and the Soviets in 1939, Lublin became part of the General Government territory occupied by Nazi Germany as part of the Germans’ Operation Barbarossa. The city was the center of the German Operation Reinhardt to exterminate the Jews in German-occupied Poland.
A significant part of the prisoners in the Lublin Ghetto, about 26,000 people, were deported to the Belzec extermination camp between March 17 and April 11, 1942, the rest were sent to the Majdanek concentration camp.
Two years later, on July 24, 1944, Lublin was recaptured by the Soviet Army and became the temporary headquarters of the Polish National Liberation Committee formed by former Soviet Union leader Joseph Stalin.


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