The world's largest iceberg broke off from Antarctica: almost the size of Istanbul

The world’s largest iceberg broke off from Antarctica: almost the size of Istanbul



The world's largest iceberg broke off from Antarctica: almost the size of Istanbul

As the world is coming to an end due to global warming caused by human activities, scientists have announced that a giant piece has broken off the Ronne ice shelf in Antarctica. The iceberg, almost the size of Istanbul, landed in the Weddell sea. Named A-76 by researchers, the iceberg also earned the title of the planet’s largest floating iceberg.

The European Space Agency (ESA) announced that a giant piece of ice, almost the size of Istanbul, broke off from the frozen edge of Antarctica, making Weddell the largest floating iceberg in the sea.
The new iceberg, dubbed A-76 by scientists, was detected in recent satellite images captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-1 mission, the space agency said on its website, along with a photo of the huge and rectangular ice sheet.
It is stated that the world’s largest floating iceberg covers 4 thousand 320 kilometers and is 175 km long. Compared to cities in Turkey, the total land and water area of ​​Istanbul is 5 thousand 343 square kilometers, while Trabzon’s is 4 thousand 628 square kilometers.
However, the size of the A-76 that broke off from Antarctica’s Ronne ice sheet is her. making it the largest iceberg available on the planet. Prior to the A-76, the A-23A floated in the Weddell sea, about 3,380 square kilometers.
The A-76 was first detected by the British Antarctic Survey and verified by the Maryland-based US National Ice Center using Copernicus Sentinel-1 images, which consist of a bipolar orbiting satellite. The Ronne ice sheet on the flank of the Antarctic peninsula is one of the largest of several huge floating ice sheets that connect to the continent’s land mass and extend into the surrounding seas.
On the other hand, the ice sheets on the Antarctic peninsula have experienced rapid fragmentation in recent years due to global warming.
The iceberg A68a, which left Antarctica in 2017, has almost disappeared from the last disintegration that occurred earlier this year.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *