Street flavors of Pakistan

Street flavors of Pakistan



Street flavors of Pakistan

In Pakistan, where it is forbidden to eat in the restaurant due to the pandemic, the people are queuing in front of the sellers of the country’s unique street food.

In Pakistan, people prefer the country’s unique street food, which is famous for its spicy dishes and snacks, at Ramadan tables. In the country, where half of Ramadan is left behind, the most preferred foods for iftarians are “samosa”, “pakora” where vegetables are fried, “celebi” dessert, and “spirit apza (rose water)” drink.
In the city of Ravalpindi, which borders the capital Islamabad and the capital, street vendors and restaurants begin to prepare these foods a few hours before the iftar.
People also queue in front of the sellers near iftar to bring hot samosa, pakora and celebi dessert to their homes. Because of the Corona virus (Covid-19) epidemic, food is forbidden in restaurants, so food is packaged and taken to homes.
Malik İrfan, who works in a restaurant in Ravalpindi, said in a statement that foods such as samosa, pakora and celebi dessert, which are among the traditional street foods of Pakistan, were consumed in abundance during Ramadan and they prepared these foods in abundance almost every day.
İrfan stated that citizens especially break their fasts with these foods and that the demand for samosa is very high. Stating that samosa sales were relatively less before Ramadan, İrfan said, “Before Ramadan, we were selling 400 to 500 samosas a day, and in Ramadan we sell around 1500 a day. People consume samosa and pakora with great pleasure,” he said.
On the other hand, in a study conducted by a research company, fruit salad, pakora and samosa were among the top three foods preferred by Pakistanis for iftar. In addition to these, meals and snacks such as chicken shish “tikka”, chicken pan, “çannah” made of chickpeas and “golgappa” are among the foods consumed at iftar.
Pakistanis prefer to break their fast with the mentioned street food instead of heavy meals. After the evening prayer, the main meals are eaten. Samosa, a type of pie, is prepared with minced meat and potatoes. Pakora, which contains vegetables and onions, is also made from chickpea flour and is fried in oil.
It is known that the ruf afza drink, which means “nourishes the soul” and “refreshes the soul,” was named after Naki Ali Şah in 1906. The fruit and rose flavored drink is prepared by mixing it with cold water or milk. Big ice is thrown into the spirit apza prepared in cauldrons at big events and street iftars.
Celebi dessert, made by throwing interlocking rings made of flour into hot oil, can also be consumed hot or cold.


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