New discovery: 'Living fossil' fish lives 100 years, pregnancy lasts 5 years

New discovery: ‘Living fossil’ fish lives 100 years, pregnancy lasts 5 years



New discovery: 'Living fossil' fish lives 100 years, pregnancy lasts 5 years

According to research conducted in France, it has been reported that the giant fish of the Coelacanth genus, which has existed for about 420 million years, can live up to 100 years. It has been reported that males of the fish, nicknamed “living fossil”, can reach up to 1.8 meters in length and 90 in weight, become sexually mature between the ages of 40 and 69, while females become sexually mature at the end of their 50s, and their pregnancy lasts up to 5 years.

According to a new study conducted in France, it was announced that the Coelacanth fish, whose lineage dates back to the dinosaur age, can live up to 100 years.
In a study conducted at the University of Montpellier, France, the body sample of the fish nicknamed “Living fossil” in the museum was examined by counting the lines on it, similar to the method of detecting age from tree rings.
The study’s findings were published in the journal Current Biology, and it was reported that the fish grow extra slow and can live for about 100 years.
It was reported that the males of the fish are sexually mature between 40 and 69 years of age, the females do not reach sexual maturity until the late 50s, and their gestation period lasts up to 5 years.
The scientists, who determined the duration of pregnancy by calculating the age of the examined embryos, stated that the males of this species can reach a length of 1.8 meters and a weight of 90 kilograms.
“Knowing the life history of the coelacanth can provide stronger protection for the continuation of their lineage,” said Dr Bruno Ernande of the University of Montpellier, France.
Commenting on the research, Harold Walker of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography said that this five-year pregnancy was “very strange” for fish or any animal.
Coelacanths, which have existed for about 420 million years, were thought to be extinct until they were found alive off the coast of South Africa in 1938. Scientists have long believed that Coelacanths live for about 20 years.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *