A first in British history: Queen Elizabeth opens Buckingham Palace garden to the public

A first in British history: Queen Elizabeth opens Buckingham Palace garden to the public



A first in British history: Queen Elizabeth opens Buckingham Palace garden to the public

For the first time in British history, the public had the opportunity to wander freely in the gardens of Buckingham Palace, where Queen Elizabeth II lived. With the practice that started today, the British had a picnic in the gardens of Buckingham Palace and took pictures to the fullest.

From today, visitors in England have the opportunity to wander unaccompanied in the gardens of Queen Elizabeth’s London home for the first time.
The construction of Buckingham Palace, which has been considered the official residence of the British monarch for centuries, began in 1703 and opened for use two years later.
The 39-decare garden was included in the palace in 1820. However, to this day, visitors to Buckingham Palace who were not accompanied by non-royal guides were not accepted.
However, the £16.50 (about 198 Turkish lira) ticket, valid until September this year, will allow tourists to explore the gardens on their own.
Sally Goodsir, director of the Royal Collection institution, said: “Due to the current pandemic situation, we were unfortunately unable to open the state rooms to visitors this year. However, it is great that we were able to open the garden.”
However, the British showed great interest in the practice. Visitors shared their poses on social media in front of beehives and plane trees planted by Queen Victoria and Prince Albert, and picnicked on their lawn.
On the other hand, traditionally, Queen Elizabeth hosts a garden party at the palace three times a year. However, these had to be canceled for the past two years due to the pandemic. Likewise, the opening of state chambers to the public in the summer months, which has been taking place since 1993, could not be continued.
Last month, officials said the Royal Family’s financial situation had taken a hit from the pandemic, losing millions of pounds normally derived from ticket sales.
Buckingham Palace’s electrical wiring is undergoing a 10-year £369 million (4 billion 420 thousand Turkish lira) repair to renew its aging infrastructure. Restoration work accelerated during the epidemic as the Queen spent most of her time at her home in Windsor Castle, outside London.
Here are colorful photos from the garden of Buckingham Palace, where a first was experienced…


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