3,000-year-old infinity pool found in Italy

3,000-year-old infinity pool found in Italy



3,000-year-old infinity pool found in Italy

An “infinity pool” used about 3,000 years ago has been found in the Po plain in northern Italy. It was stated that the pool, which was dated to the Bronze Age, was made of oak wood. A number of artifacts, including ceramic vessels and figurines, were also found in the pool, which consists of two overlapping tanks reflecting the sky and appearing like another realm to the worshipers in the area.

Researchers from Cornell University in the USA discovered an infinity pool from the Bronze Age in Italy. It is stated that the pool, which was used for religious rituals 3,000 years ago, is roughly 12 meters long, 7 meters wide and 3 meters deep. However, scientists have uncovered a number of historical artifacts at the bottom of the pool, including ceramic vessels and figurines that they believe were used as offerings during supernatural rituals.
Using radiocarbon analysis and tree-ring dating, the researchers determined that the lower tank was built in 1444 BC and the upper tank was built in 1432 BC. The infinity pool was named “Noceto Vasca Votiva”, which means votive tank in Italian. It was first discovered in 2015 on a small hill in the Po Plain, located between the Alps and the Apennines. However, archaeologists could not agree on the date of the colossal monument during this period.
The latest study, published in the scientific journal Science Daily, was led by Stuart Manning, Cornell’s professor of arts and sciences, who used the method of dendrochronology to reveal the dates of the pools. Dendrochronology is the scientific method of dating tree rings to the exact year they were formed. Manning and his team, combined with dendrochronology and radiocarbon dating, revealed that the pools were built more than a decade apart. “When you’re working at an archaeological site, you’re usually trying to do dendrochronology with relatively few samples, sometimes with less than ideal conditions. Because they disperse before we see 3,500 years. They’re not like a healthy tree growing in the wild right now,” Manning said.
On the other hand, the findings of the study confirm that Noceto Vasca Votiva was built at a moment of crucial social change and support the researchers’ theory that the structure was used for a supernatural water ritual. “We have only one way of life that has worked for hundreds of years,” Manning said. Then you make the transition to larger settlements, more international trade, more specialization such as textile production, and a change in burial practices. All over the world there is a certain pattern. A major construction effort begins when a major change occurs in almost every social community. In other words, when you establish the first states in Egypt, you get the pyramids, and in England, you get Stonehenge,” he said.
On the other hand, the researchers dispelled the idea that the structure was once used as a reservoir or well, due to the fact that it sits on a hill and has smooth layers of sediment inside. Also, no evidence of channels to drain water from the huge pool was found. The lower part was filled with ceramic pots, figurines and various stone, wood and organic items.
According to the researchers, all this evidence indicates that the structure was used in some kind of supernatural water ritual.


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